Google Just Made Bing the Best Search Engine

12 Jan

Ok, so maybe it’s not true that you need to switch from Google to Bing if you’re a big Googler like I am, but recently, Google started prioritizing Google Plus search results over actual search results. With few people actually on Google +, why would you actually want to see those few people’s trending topics? If anything, wouldn’t you want to see Facebook’s trending topics as search results?

Well, Microsoft has that option to prioritize your Facebook’s friends’ links and posts.

Although, this may be great for search engine optimization (post something to Google Plus and then have it come up as the top result for someone’s else Google query), will this actually destroy Google and cause people to switch to Bing for more relevant and efficient results?

I actually wrote a lengthy final paper on this for one of my grad school classes (Hi-Tech Entrepreneurship with Dr. Yongseok Jang)…and it looks like my prediction may be coming true. (My Dec. 15, 2011 G+ post: “I’m starting to see some serious value in Google Plus. SEO for posts go straight to the top of google searches. May be the way G+ stays alive.” – https://plus.google.com/104130596638112501766/posts/H2csj1MJpCa)

Time will tell which search engine people will use. Until then, what are you sticking with and why? Google, and its potential for your own SEO, or Microsoft’s much-improved Bing? Will you start using Google Plus as a result of this?

Leave a comment below.

Source: Google Just Made Bing the Best Search Engine. (Gizmodo)

Google Just Made Bing the Best Search Engine

I just switched the default search engine in my browser from Google to Bing. And if you care about working efficiently, or getting the right results when you search, then maybe you should too. Don’t laugh!

Google changed the way search works this week. It deeply integrated Google+ into search results. It’s ostensibly meant to deliver more personalized results. But it pulls those personalized results largely from Google services—Google+, Picasa, YouTube. Search for a restaurant, and instead of its Yelp page, the top result might be someone you know discussing it on Google Plus. Over at SearchEngineland, Danny Sullivan has compiled a series of damning examples of the ways Google’s new interface promotes Plus over relevancy. Long story short: It’s a huge step backwards.

A lot of people are crying foul, and even “anti-trust.” Sure, it does seem pretty transparently designed to drive traffic and users to Google Plus, and to make Google Plus brand pages the go-to place for a company’s social media presence. And it’s true that results from Facebook and Twitter in particular have been noticeably kicked down.

But I didn’t switch for political reasons, or as an act of protest. I don’t care if Google hurts Twitter or Facebook—or even Friendster for that matter. Boo-hoo. I only care if it hurts me. And this does. Google broke itself.

For years, Google Search has been the highest quality web product I’ve ever used. It has remained consistently essential as an information-delivery mechanism. I typically hit it hundreds of times a day—on my phone, tablet, laptop and desktop. But with one update it wiped out all those years of loyalty and goodwill it had built up. Sure, I can opt out of social results with a click—but as with all things I don’t want to have to opt out. I don’t want to have to make that extra click. I want to enter a query, and have the most relevant results returned to me as quickly as possible. (And if Google genuinely doesn’t think it’s a big deal for people to take the extra step oft opting out, why has it focused so relentlessly on optimizing speed for so many years?)

The great thing is, of course, you can just switch. Hit up your browser preferences, and swap your default to Bing. I know, I know, but yes I’m serious. Sure, Bing had a rocky start. But if you haven’t seen it recently it’s worth another look. It has a super clean interface. It’s fast. Andoperators work the way you expect them to. Best of all it’s relevant.

In short, it’s a lot like Google. Not the Google of today, but the Google you fell in love with, the one that put your search results above its financial ones. The Google that delivered.

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