Archive | February, 2012

Grab 50GB of Free Storage for Life on Box by Using the Android App

23 Feb

Grab 50GB of Free Storage for Life on Box by Using the Android App.

Grab 50GB of Free Storage for Life on Box by Using the Android App

Online storage and sharing service Box is serving up 50GB of free space to all Android users. All you have to do it log in from the Android app, which has been updated with some new features, by midnight March 23rd.

Last year Box gave iOS users this 50GB upgrade and now it’s finally Android users’ turn. Here are the instructions from Box’s blog:

This promotion ends on Friday, March 23, 2012 at 11:59pm PST, so grab your free 50GB on Box by following these steps:

1. Visit the Android Marketplace and download Box for Android
2. Log into your account or register for a new one directly from the app
3. Start sharing and collaborating in the cloud
4. (optional but recommended) Tell the world how you’ll use your 50GB with the hashtag #Box50GB

Your file upload limit will also be bumped up to 100MB. Your new 50GB total storage space can be accessed from any device (not just Android).

Updates to the Android app include bulk uploading, adding collaborators to a shared folder, leaving comments on files, and additional languages.

While Box doesn’t sync your files, 50GB of extra cloud storage could come in quite handy.

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80% OFF Adobe Photoshop and ALL Creative Suite 5.5 Products w/ .edu Email!

22 Feb

Get Photoshop and Any Other Adobe Creative Suite Tool for 80% Off in Today’s App Deals.

Get Photoshop and Any Other Adobe Creative Suite Tool for 80% Off in Today’s App Deals

The Daily App Deals post is a round-up of the best app discounts of the day, as well as some notable mentions for ones that are on sale.

The Best

Get Photoshop and Any Other Adobe Creative Suite Tool for 80% Off in Today’s App DealsAdobe Photoshop CS5 Extended Student and Teacher Edition(Adobe) Previously $199, now $39.80. Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended Student and Teacher Edition for Windows or Mac is Adobe’s flagship photo editing/creation tool, now available for 80% off for those that have a .edu email account. This deal is also valid for those that would rather purchase Creative Suite 5.5 Master Collection Student and Teacher Edition as well as a few other Adobe products. Get it for $39.80. (via LogicBuy)

Update: We’ve been told this deal has been canceled since we posted this, but the discount appears to still be working for us. Your mileage may vary.

Tomahawk Combines Your Local Music with Spotify, Grooveshark, and Others to Put Virtually Any Song at Your Fingertips

22 Feb

Tomahawk Combines Your Local Music with Spotify, Grooveshark, and Others to Put Virtually Any Song at Your Fingertips.

Tomahawk Combines Your Local Music with Spotify, Grooveshark, and Others to Put Virtually Any Song at Your Fingertips

Windows/Mac/Linux: Tomahawk is a free desktop music player that combines your local library with the libraries of our favorite streaming music services, like Spotify, Grooveshark, and more, so you don’t need to open a multitude of separate players to listen to your music.

We love streaming services, but none of them have a perfect selection, and it would be nice if you could combine them all into one service. Tomahawk does this, starting off with your local library and letting you add extensions—called resolvers—to bring in libraries from services like Spotify, Grooveshark, Last.fm, Soundcloud, YouTube, Ex.fm, and even 4Shared. That way, you have the best of each library, without any of the holes. The player isn’t anything too special otherwise, but then again, neither is Spotify’s or Grooveshark’s.

You’ll need a premium account for the services like Spotify and Grooveshark, and you may need to grab the extensions from Tomahawk’s web site—some aren’t included with the program—but overall, it’s pretty simple to build up one streaming library to rule them all (now if only they had Rdio, too). Check out the video above to see it in action.

Tomahawk is a free download for all platforms.

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right Now

17 Feb

 

This morning, Apple announced the next version of Mac OS X, dubbed Mountain Lion, is scheduled to be available at the end of summer. It’s filled with cool new features, but who wants to wait until this summer to get them? Here’s how you can get the best features of Mountain Lion right now.

Messages

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowMessages is a little like iChat, but it lets you send messages to iOS devices via iMessage, and if you have Mac OS X 10.7.3 on your computer, you can actually start using theMessages beta today. Just download it, install it, and start keeping your messages in sync across all your Apple devices.

Notification Center

You’ve probably seen Notification Center on iOS 5 as it was probably the most-desired feature lacking from Apple’s mobile operating system. It provides a more subtle notification system on your mobile device and a pulldown list to see your current notification history. A similar feature will be available as part of Mac OS X Mountain Lion. Although Apple’s Notification Center for the desktop is going to be a far more robust, most of us currently use Growl for notification banners. Growl will cost you a few dollars if you want the latest version, but you can download an older copy for free. The advantage of paying is that the latest version (only available for Mac OS X Lion 10.7 or later) includes a feature called Rollup, which is essentially the same as Notification Center. (See the screenshot to the right for an example.) It saves your notifications in a little window so you can see what you missed while you were away.

 

Growl is limited by what can send it messages, however, so you won’t receive notifications for things like SMS and calls. If you’re a Google Voice user you can get those notifications by installing an app like GrowlVoice ($5) or BigPhone ($5 / Free). These apps not only let you get call and text notifications on your computer, but let you respond to both as well.

AirPlay Mirroring

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowAirPlay Mirroring takes whatever is on your Mac’s screen and wirelessly mirrors it on your television (via an Apple TV) or any other device that can receive an AirPlay transmission. You can do this right now with an app called AirParrot ($10). It provides the exact same functionality. If you want to take things a step further than Mountain Lion can offer, then you’ll also want to check outAirServer. This app will let you receive AirPlay signals on your Mac so you can send video from other devices, like your iPhone or iPad, and watch them on the computer.

GateKeeper

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowGateKeeper is Apple’s attempt at preventing malware on your Mac, and it does this by letting you decide which kinds of apps are allowed to run and which apps are not. You can run any app you download (the way things currently work in Lion), only allow Mac App Store apps or apps signed with an official Apple developer ID to run, or just allow apps downloaded directly from the Mac App Store to run. Obviously you can currently run all apps or just Mac App Store apps right now, without any fancy features, but the developer ID check is definitely something new. While we believe that you’ll be just fine if you’re diligent, there is malware protection and antivirus software for your Mac should you want to play it extra safe right now.

iCloud

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowiCloud—Apple’s service that syncs all your information to the cloud and across devices—is already a part of Mac OS X, but the integration is deeper in Mountain Lion. One of the features Apple is touting in the iCloud upgrade is document sync, allowing you to access your documents across multiple computers and mobile devices. You can have that right now with InSync and a Google Docs account. InSync lets you access all your Google Docs files directly from your desktop and keeps them in sync with the online version as well as any other computers. Of course, there’s also Dropbox. It’s not exactly the same thing, but it will keep your documents in sync and we do love it a lot.

Share Sheets

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowShare Sheets is a feature that essentially places a drop-down menu in your browser (and a few other apps) so you can easily share media with others through various services. You can achieve this same effect in any web browser by creating a folder of bookmarklets—little pieces of JavaScript that perform simple functions. For example, bookmarklets exist to save an article to Instapaper or Read It Latershare on Facebook or Twittersend an image to Flickrsend a web page as an email, and much more. There are so many bookmarklets nowadays that you really just have to search for what you want to accomplish with the word “bookmarklet” after it and you’ll have it. As a result, you can build out your own Share Sheet-esque bookmarklet folder with more functionality than Mountain Lion will be able to provide.

Notes

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowNotes is Apple’s addition of a syncing notes application to Mac OS X, but there’s absolutely no reason to wait for Mountain Lion to get this functionality whenNotational Velocity, using the Simplenoteservice, already provides this exact functionality. In fact, Simplenote is so well done that you’ll probably continue to use it after you get your hands on Apple’s official syncing notes application. Simplenote has apps for iOSAndroid, and Windows so you have the additional advantage of using any platform you want. If you want to use rich text and images, try Evernote instead.

Reminders

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right NowReminders is just a simple to-do app, and there are plenty of those to go around on Mac OS X already. Our favorite isWunderlist, which is a slightly more robust task management app that works on multiple platforms so you’re not syncing your to-dos with just your Mac. You can have them on your iPhoneiPadAndroid,Windows computer as well. It also works in your web browser, providing access just about anywhere.

How to Get the Best Features of Mac OS X Mountain Lion Right Now.

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion is Coming This Summer & Looking More iOS-Like Than Ever

16 Feb

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion: Looking More iOS-Like Than Ever.

 

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion: Looking More iOS-Like Than Ever

Seemingly out of nowhere, Mountain Lion, the next version of the Apple’s OS X operating system, is formally in the works and will be on our computers later this summer. Most intriguing is that it will further blur the lines between iOS and OS X, bringing apps like Messages, Notes, Reminders along with utilties such as Notification Center and—FINALLY—AirPlay Mirroring.

Based on what Apple is revealing for now, many of the new features revolve bringing iOS functionality to the desktop. Not only do these new apps and features behave the same as their iOS analogs, but they seamlessly sync with those apps as well. Let’s take a look at each.

Messages

Messages will completely replace iChat, allowing you to trade iMessages back and forth with those on their iOS device (but don’t worry, it’ll still support AIM, Gtalk, etc.). FaceTime has also been integrated into the app, further consolidating all of Apple’s messaging platforms. If done correctly, this could be the end of the awkward divide between iMessage, iChat and FaceTime.

Notes

Write down a few notes on the mobile Notes app, and they’ll appear on your desktop. The desktop version, however, has a few new tricks. You can pin notes to your desktop (remember stickies before they got pushed into the widgets layer?). You can also drag and drop images into notes and send those off to other people.

Notification Center

And from the looks of things, Notification Center is looking to completely and utterly upstage Growl, which has served as the de facto OS X notification framework for years. The OS X version behaves much like the iOS iteration, with a full drop down menu, and banner updates, which look uncannily like Growl bubbles.

Gatekeeper

Gatekeeper is a simple, preemptive security barrier for people worried about downloading malicious programs. Malware isn’t much of a problem on OS X, but if you’re worried, Gatekeeper will let you assign one of three set download levels: anything, Mac App Store only, or programs from trusted developers plus everything in the App Store. If something violates the security level you’ve set, you won’t be able to install it. This should go well with the grandparents.

Twitter

Twitter is now built into OS X. Mountain Lion will let you, say, tweet photos and links directly from iPhoto and Safari, and every time you’re mentioned or hit with a direct message, you’ll get an automatic notification—no extra Twitter software needed.

Game Center

The iOS Game Center has always been neglected backwater territory for Apple, so Mountain Lion is pushing it right onto your desktop. You’ll get to plug into the same leader boards and friend-finding available on your phone, but now it’s on your laptop! Hey! It’s unclear whether this is just for games available on both OS X and iOS, or whether just Mac gamers will be able to go at it with each other.

Gatekeeper

Your to-do list is getting spun out of iCal into its own app, allowing for multiple, searchable lists that are synced between your Mac and all of your iOS devices.

Share Sheets

You know that arrow icon on your iPhone? The one that you click to share photos from your albums? Now you’ll be able to do that same thing throughout OS X apps, too: emailing your notes, uploading your videos, and tweeeeeeeeting will all be done from one handy icon.

Facebook IPO: Zynga Generates 12% of Our Revenue and We Need Them

16 Feb

Facebook IPO: Zynga Generates 12% of Our Revenue and We Need Them.

Facebook IPO: Zynga Generates 12% of Our Revenue and We Need Them

Facebook generated $3.71 billion in sales last year; some $445 million of that came from its partnership with Zynga. Facebook made $1.97 billion in 2010. 

With Facebook’s growing revenue, you can surely expect Zynga to follow and do the same. Social is the new way to game.

Future MacBook Pros to Have MacBook Air-like Bodies in March 2012. Standard SSD, Ivy Bridge (20% Faster), Insane Battery Life, and Touchpad Expanded to Entire Palmrest

14 Feb

The Next-Generation MacBook Pro 2012.

The Next-Generation MacBook Pro 2012

Updates will include (standard):

  • MacBook Air-like body for all MacBook Pros (including the 15-in, but possible excluding the 17-in)
  • SSD Drives
  • Intel Ivy Bridge (20% Faster)
  • Insane Battery Life (since there’s no Hard Drive, Ethernet, or Firewire)
  • And a Touchpad Expanded to the Entire Palmrest (transition to the iPad/tablets everywhere)

Unbelievable New Camera Technology Erases People in the Background of Your Pictures

14 Feb

Unbelievable New Camera Technology Erases People in the Background of Your Pictures.

We’ve all been there. You’re setting up a shot that perfectly frames your friend against the background but as you snap your picture the people in the background start moving around and mess it all up. The picture is ruined, your friend looks like a bobbing ocean buoy amongst a sea of people and you hate everyone.

Well, Scalado fixes this with a new camera technology that can fix that all too common situation, it’s called Remove.

If We All Avoid Purchasing These “S” Apple Products Like The iPad 2S, We Can Make Apple Release a Much Better Product (The iPad 3, The Actual Product We All Really Want) #teechy

14 Feb

By staying out of Apple’s spin zone (which creates hype and empties wallets in just its pre-order stages for a minutely-upgraded product like the iPhone 4S), we can all force Apple to release a much more advanced and better version of the iPad and/or iPhone if we don’t buy in to these small “S” upgrades that Apple pushes out every few months. Why? Because Apple launches these small upgrades solely because we all buy this stuff and fall into the Apple hype! (Don’t get me wrong, Apple has great products, but Apple could release even BETTER products if we had some patience and didn’t buy into the small, insignificant upgrades (like Siri) that Apple pushes.) Since we all empty our wallets for Apple’s small upgrades, they have no incentive to let their more significant innovations out into the marketplace until purchases of these “S” (small upgrades) upgrades start slowing down.

Main point? Don’t buy an “S” or updated Apple product with insignificant hardware or software updates. Apple can do much better than that. They know they can, but they won’t do it unless we voice this concern and avoid succumbing into Apple’s new products that are just small, overhyped upgrades to their already existing products (why we got the iPhone 4S instead of getting the iPhone 5 that everyone wanted w/ Retina Display and SD Card expansion slots for more memory).

I’m Already Bored With The iPad 3 | TechCrunch.

The iPad 3 is coming next month. Or so says the endless rumors. These rumors also state the next iPad will have higher resolution screen and high-speed data connection. But I couldn’t care less. The iPad 3, if that’s really its name, sounds like a stop-gap upgrade to me.

You see, I’m perfectly happy with my iPad 2. Save the addition of an SD card slot, there isn’t a single feature I can imagine that will make me trade up to Apple’s new hotness. I guess the iPad 3 sounds great, but it also sounds boring. That’s not saying Apple won’t sell a zillion iPad 3s. It will. But it’s going to take more than a spec bump for me (and likely many others) to upgrade from the iPad 2.

Prior to most Apple events, rumors swirl, promising a revolutionary device that will change life on planet Earth forever. But then the iPhone 4S launches. A fine piece of hardware, sure, but far from spectacular. But there hasn’t been any wide-eyed iPad 3 rumors but rather just predictable leaks stating there will be a slight hardware bump.

Part of my dystopian outlook is that I’m pretty damn happy with the iPad 2. I passed on the original iPadannoyed over the lack of external storage and USB support. I instead waited for the Android tablets but quickly discovered Honeycomb’s main fault involves trying to replicate a desktop environment rather than creating a mobile one. I have a dozen notebooks for traditional mobile computing. So I got a 16GB Verizon iPad last summer. I’ve never been so happy with a device. I’ve had it since July 2011 and still use it hours a day. Apps make up 95% of my usage — the majority of which are not available on Android. I fire up Safari just to check TechCrunch and Techmeme.

A prettier screen is not going to change or increase my usage unless Apple backsteps and includes a SD card slot — which it won’t. When the original iPad launched, I dreamed of using it as a on-location photo viewer. I imagined using the tablet in conjunction with a cloud service for iPhoto. But instead Apple released a lame Dock Connect adapter which falls short of my expectation. The current screen looks great. Have you played Infinity Blade 2 or Rage? Awesome.

It’s important to remember that Apple doesn’t need to reinvent the iPad. The company makes piles of cash by outing successful products and keeping them on the market as long as possible. The iPad 3 will likely be just a spec bump to stay competitive for 2012 and 2013. It will match (and outsell) future Android tablets, causing companies like Samsung, Asus and Motorola to quickly redesign and release an even more “powerful” tablet just to get a bit of an edge.

Apple didn’t need to release the iPhone 5 in 2011 because the iPhone 4 was still outselling most other phones. Instead, Apple released the iPhone 4S, which while packing some new innards, is mostly a stop-gap solution allowing the company to milk additional revenue from supply contracts on aging components. It worked. Apple sold 17.1 million iPhones in the last part of 2011 on its way to be the most valuable company. The iPhone 4S gives Apple even more time to refine the iPhone 5 while negating more favorable manufacturing and supply deals.

The same thing could happen to the iPad 2. Apple could release the iPad 2S. It would be faster, packing LTE data and a quad-core A6 CPU along with featuring a higher-res screen. Of course there would probably be a new camera and new software to take advantage of the quad-core CPU — the software would likely be exclusive to just the new model, though.

The WSJ reports that Apple is playing with an 8-inch iPad. But once again, Apple doesn’t need to release an 8-incher right now. Sure, the Kindle Fire is scooping up plenty of marketshare but the tablet scene is far from saturated and the Fire helps bring attention to the product type. If Apple releases a stop-gap iPad in the coming weeks, I fully expect the company to completely reinvent its mobile line before the holiday season including a smaller, cheaper iPad.

I’m sitting the next iPad out. My iPad 2 works just fine and none of the rumored iPad 3 features justify upgrading to me. Apple will likely hype a meaningless feature during the keynote, deeming it a game changer. But I’ve learned my lesson. Heads will stop spinning shortly after the event and reality will set in. Avoid the Apple spin zone. It has a tendency of sucking credit cards towards pre-order buttons.

Powerful iPad 3 to Debut March 7, 2012?

13 Feb

The iPad 3 Will Appear March 7th?.

Could it be true? The iPad 3 is said to launch sometime in March 2012, and iMore (with a good track record for calling these things) claims March 7 to be the day.

Highlights for the iPad 3:

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